International Day

National Election Day 2022: Important Dates, Messages & Quotes

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The day of a general election is known as election day or polling day. To allow the greatest number of voters to participate, general elections are frequently held on a Saturday or Sunday; in contrast, elections are frequently held on a weekday. Election day, however, is a public holiday in several nations or parts of nations that hold elections on a weekday. Countries that allow voters to cast absentee ballots, early ballots, or postal votes by mail prior to the election completely bypass the issue by allowing them to cast their ballots on a day that is more convenient to them.

Elections are typically held on Sundays, however, this is less prevalent in the Anglosphere, where weekdays are used in the US, UK, and Canada, while Saturdays are used in New Zealand and Australia. Protestantism, which historically prohibited activities other than attending church on Sundays, played a role in this to some extent (typically seen as occurring on a Sunday). Election night, when the results of the election are totaled and the winners are declared, typically follows an election day.

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Important Dates for the National Election Day 2022:

Date Event
February 25, 2022 The first day to circulate and file nomination petitions for Representatives in Congress and statewide offices (U.S. Senator, Governor, and Lt. Governor)
March 15, 2022 Last day to circulate and file nomination petitions for Congressional and statewide offices
March 16, 2022 The first day to circulate and file nomination papers for Congressional and statewide offices
March 18, 2022 The first day to circulate and file nomination petitions for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of the State Committee
March 22, 2022 Last day to file objections to nomination petitions for Congressional and statewide offices
March 23, 2022 Last day for withdrawal by candidates who filed nomination petitions for Congressional and statewide offices
March 25, 2022 Last day that may be fixed by the Commonwealth Court for hearings on objections that have been filed to nomination petitions for Congressional and statewide offices
March 28, 2022 Last day to circulate and file nomination petitions for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of the State Committee
March 29, 2022 The first day to circulate and file nomination papers for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of State Committee
March 29, 2022 Last day for the Commonwealth Court to render decisions in cases involving objections that have been filed to nomination petitions for Congressional and statewide offices
March 30, 2022 Ballot Position Lottery for candidates appearing on the primary ballot
March 31, 2022 Last day for withdrawal by candidates who filed nomination petitions for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of the State Committee
April 2, 2022 Last day for the County Boards of Elections to send all remote and non-remote military and overseas ballots
April 4, 2022 Last day to file objections to nomination petitions for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of State Committee
April 7, 2022 Last day that may be fixed by the Commonwealth Court for hearing objections that have been filed to nomination petitions for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of State Committee
April 12, 2022 Last day for the Commonwealth Court to render decisions in cases involving objections that have been filed to nomination petitions for Senator in the General Assembly, Representative in the General Assembly, and Member of the State Committee
May 2, 2022 Last day to REGISTER before the primary
May 10, 2022 Last day to apply for a mail-in or civilian absentee ballot
May 17, 2022 Last day for County Board of Elections to receive voted mail-in and civilian absentee ballots (must be received by 8:00 P.M.)
May 17, 2022 GENERAL PRIMARY 
May 18, 2022 The first day to REGISTER after primary
May 24, 2022 Last day for County Board of Elections to receive voted military and overseas absentee ballots (submitted for delivery no later than 11:59 P.M. on May 16)
August 1, 2022 Last day to circulate and file nomination papers
August 8, 2022 Last day for withdrawal by candidates nominated by nomination papers
August 15, 2022 Last day for withdrawal by candidates nominated at the primary
October 24, 2022 Last day to REGISTER before the November election
November 1, 2022 Last day to apply for a mail-in or civilian absentee ballot
November 8, 2022 Last day for County Boards of Elections to receive voted mail-in and civilian absentee ballots (must be received by 8:00 P.M.)
November 8, 2022 GENERAL ELECTION
November 9, 2022 The first day to REGISTER after the November election
November 15, 2022 Last day for County Board of Elections to receive voted military and overseas absentee ballots (submitted for delivery no later than 11:59 P.M. on November 7)

national election day

Origin of the Election Day

By 1792, federal law gave each state legislature the freedom to select presidential electors at any time before the first Wednesday in December, within a 34-day window. Elections in November were convenient since the harvest would be over but the worst winter weather, which would impede travel, would not yet have come. The election results would also roughly coincide with the start of a new year. Election day was set for Tuesday so that people could go to church on Sunday, go to the polls on Monday (which were typically in the county seat), and cast their ballots before Wednesday, which was typically when farmers would offer their goods at the market.  Initially, the process used by governments to select electors varied greatly. States gradually shifted toward some sort of popular vote.

The creation of the Morse electric telegraph, which Congress supported in 1843 and successfully tested in 1844, was a technological accomplishment that unmistakably heralded the impending national adoption of instant communication. Congress responded in 1845 by requiring a standard national date for selecting Presidential electors in order to prevent knowledge from one state from determining election outcomes in another. As the time between Election Day and the primary Wednesday in December is almost always 29 days, Congress picked the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November to align current voting practice with the existing 34-day frame under federal law.

Election Day will henceforth only be held during the week of November 2–8, inclusive. States eventually brought the majority of elections into compliance with this date starting with the Presidential elections. The beginning and end dates for the terms of the Head of state, Vice President, Members of Congress, and Senators were altered by the Twentieth Amendment, which was ratified in 1933. Election Day’s timetable was unaffected. 45 years after Martin Luther King Jr.’s lecture on equality, Barack Obama became the very first African-American to be nominated as president of the United States in 2008.

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Postal and early voting

Voters can cast their ballots before Election Day in most states thanks to early voting laws. Prior to election day, early voting periods range from 4 to 50 days. In-person early voting is permitted in 32 states and Washington, D.C. 30% of ballots cast in the 2008 presidential election were early ballots.

Additionally, every state has some sort of absentee voting system. 27 states and the District of Columbia let absentee voting by mail without a reason, and another 21 states permit it with one. In 7 states and D.C., unconditional perpetual absentee voting is permitted. Voters receive their ballots many weeks before election day in Colorado, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and Hawaii for all major elections.

Weekends on election day

Due to the fact that Louisiana’s statewide elections are held on odd years and the province’s exceptional primary system, a variation of the politically neutral blanket primary, only requires a runoff to be held on federal election day (Tuesday) for those workplaces for which neither of the top two candidates receives an absolute majority of the vote, Louisiana is currently the only state in the United States to hold de facto general elections on a Saturday.

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First-round voting

Voters can express their preferences for a candidate in a general election, local election, or by-election by participating in primary elections, which are sometimes shortened to primaries. Voters may be drawn from the general public in an “open primary” or just from members of a political party in a “closed primary,” depending on the nation and administrative divisions within the nation. There are further variations on primaries that are utilized by many nations hosting elections around the world, and these are covered here.

National Election Day 2022: Quotes

  • Someone struggled for your right to vote. Use it.”- Susan B. Anthony
  • “When we vote, our values are put into action and our voices are heard. Your voice is a reminder that you matter because you do, and you deserve to be heard.” – Meghan Markle
  • “We have the power to make a difference. But we need to VOTE.”  – Kylie Jenner
  • “Every election is determined by the people who show up.” – Larry J. Sabato
  • “You’ve got to vote, vote, vote, vote. That’s it; that’s the way we move forward.” – Michelle Obama
  • “Democracy is based upon the conviction there are extraordinary possibilities in ordinary people.” – Harry Emerson Fosdick
  • “Your voices are being heard and you’re proving to our ancestors that their struggles were not in vain. Now we have one more thing we need to do to walk in our true power, and that is to vote.” – Beyonce
  • “All of us may have been created equal. But we’ll never actually be equal until we all vote. So don’t wait.” – Leonardo DiCaprio
  • “Talk is cheap, voting is free; take it to the polls.” – Nanette L. Avery
  • “Democracy is about voting and it’s about a majority vote. And it’s time that we started exercising the Democratic process.” – Debbie Stabenow
  • “A man without a vote is a man without protection.” – Lyndon B. Johnson
  • “If you don’t vote, you lose the right to complain.” – George Carli
  • “Voting is the expression of our commitment to ourselves, one another, this country, and this world.” – Sharon Salzberg
  • “The Ballot is stronger than the Bullet” – Abraham Lincoln
  • “It’s not enough to just want change … You have to go and make a change by voting.” – Taylor Swift

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