lang="en-US"> Daisy Gatson Bates Day 2023 - Dates, History, Wishes & Quotes

Daisy Gatson Bates Day 2023 – Dates, History, Wishes & Quotes

Daisy Gatson Bates Day, a celebration honoring a young girl who was a famous singer for one of America’s most popular children’s songs, began in 1932. Her own mother, an educated lady of “the old school”, believed she had given her daughter the gift of song. She was a very sweet girl who sang all day long, and her father, a very successful salesman, taught her all he knew about selling products, advertising, and business.

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On this day, in accordance with the United States Flag, two flags are hoisted at half-mast on the grounds of the White House. The American flag is at half-mast on other federal properties. It is not hoisted on the president’s personal plane or residence. President George W. Bush officially names this day in accordance with United States Flag Code, including the second blue flag atop the US flag when he flies in the presidential aircraft.

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In the years since Daisy Gatson’s death, this tribute day has continued to be commemorated with various activities. The original program for the Daisy Gatson Day Celebration included the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner” by Old Navy. At the time, many corporations would not advertise under the Children’s Special Olympics banner, and so “The Star-Spangled Banner” was held down until the conclusion of the celebration.

There have also been many children involved in memorial programs commemorating Daisy Gatson Bates Day, as well as an annual Daisy Gatson Day Parade down Main Street in Washington, D.C. These events represent the larger efforts of Daisy Gatson’s family to continue spreading the fame of their beloved daughter.

Daisy Gatson Bates Day 2023 – Dates, History, Wishes & Quotes

On February 3, 2021, we celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of Daisy Gatson’s death. This celebration marks both her untimely passing and the enduring legacy of her unrivaled spirit and love for her mother, husband, and children. She was posthumously inducted into the Florida State Hall of Fame, which has chosen her as a finalist for the National Teacher of the Year award, as well as the Outstanding Teacher of the Month award.

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Also receiving this honor was Betty Jo Crisler, who serves today as the director of communications for the Florida State Department of Education. These and other Florida state holidays are commemorated with a wide variety of activities that recognize her contributions to our nation and the teaching community.

History of Daisy Gatson Bates Day:

The United States flag has been at the head of the principal structure every January for the past two hundred and fifty years. At the point when the first national confederacy was formed, it was in protest against the Articles of Constitution declared by the Continental Congress. On this very day, in 1776, delegates met in Philadelphia to discuss these matters and establish a better form of government. These meetings led to the formation of our nation.

The United States Presidents have been selected by the people through elections; as a result of which, there have been eleven U.S Presidents, all of whom are listed on the February 10 Birthday Party List.

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The United States Birthday Party is the only time during the year when the flag is not hoisted at half-mast on the day. It was on this very date that the United States Congress passed the resolution officially naming the day in honor of Daisy Gatson Bates. The resolution did not specify the exact design for the banner, so the different states used their own specifications for the colors used.

As we approach the centennial of Daisy Gatson’s sad demise, it is fitting that her name will forever be linked with the battle that she so gallantly fought for the ideals that she believed in. Now, as the twenty-fifth commemoration of her untimely passing, we are seeing the emergence of historical museum displays that will highlight this early American President and his role in our nation’s history.

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